Inspired grandmas knit a tiny version of their town, complete with woolly postboxes

0
12

A group of knitting-mad ladies have created a mini woollen version of their home town – including the the local pub and church.

The seven-strong team have spent the last two years furiously threading the quiet high street on Thrapston, Northants,, complete with hanging baskets and pedestrians.

The group, whose oldest member is 93-years-old, made more than 15 of Thrapston’s most prominent buildings including the old town cinema and local post office.

Leader of the group, Sue Couves, 63, said: “I really love doing this, we just sit around knitting until someone has a good idea.”

The woolly town includes the 1790s pub The Fox Inn, complete with a man having a quiet pint with a book in the beer garden.

The knitting team, who call themselves the ‘Thrapston Yarn Bombers’ also perfectly copied the local post office, butchers and even their quaint 90-year-old single screen cinema The Plaza.

Retired hairdresser Sue said that the crowning glory of their mini market town is their recreation of St James Church, with an incredible spire and they even remade the stained glass window.

She said: “My first project was the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, but we have been working on this project for a long time.

“And then I saw that another group of yarn bombers made something similar, so I decided that we’d ‘one up’ them.”

The long project included knitting tiny recognisable figures, such as the town’s postman and pharmacist.

The elderly hobbyists even knitted a football pitch and a houseboat on the river Nene.

The knitting team decided to put the mini high street on display at their local church to raise funds to fix its falling roof.

The Yarn Bombers will also put the woolly road on display at a week long arts festival.

Yarn Bombing is a form of graffiti which cover bollards and statues with colourful knits instead of spray paint.

Local fan Lindsey Burch said: “I can’t knit but I am a great supporter of these ladies, they bring great joy to our town.”

Some have even compared the high street to historic masterpieces, Hazel Downes on Facebook wrote: “What a work of art, akin to the Bayeux Tapestry! Wonderful!”